There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.
Lift the handle release (see Use and Care booklet for part names; the handle release is a rectangular shaped knob) and turn one quarter turn, rotate handle clockwise to extend. Lock handle release with one quarter turn. To fold for storage, allow the unit to cool, lift the handle release and turn one quarter turn, rotate handle into folded position, and lock handle release with one quarter turn.
Disclosure: This post is brought to you by Business Insider's Insider Picks team. We aim to highlight products and services you might find interesting, and if you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback. Have something you think we should know about? Email us at insiderpicks@businessinsider.com.
Juicers that are simple to setup, use, take apart, and clean will get used more often versus relegating them to the bottom of a closet. However, if you want a multifunction juicer that also makes nut butter, sorbets, or baby food it may be worth some extra assembly. Juicers with large feed tubes significantly reduce produce prep time and also the time it takes to feed it into the machine. Juicers with external pulp containers allow you to continue juicing in bulk without pausing to remove pulp. Juicer cleaning can be daunting so seek models with specialized brushes that make cleaning easier, and dishwasher friendly is always a bonus. 
While its blade chamber is super effective for firm fruits and veggies like carrots or apples, it doesn’t work that well on separated thin leaves. It spins and sends most of the leaves into the pulp collector before even shredding them. You can create some juice by packing the leaves together, but it still wastes too much of the veggies to consider it worth the effort.
Some compact juicers collect the pulp in an internal basket, but most others eject the pulp outside of the machine into a container that is specifically sized for the juicer. We recommend purchasing a juice extractor that ejects the pulp externally– this allows you to make larger quantities of juice without having to take extra time to stop your juicer, open it up, and empty the basket. Once you get juicing, you don’t want to have to stop before you’re finished.
Considering the 15-year warranty on the Omega J8004 model’s motor and parts, we think this is the best value juicer you can get compared with cheaper models with shorter warranties. Although its price is more palatable than the Tribest’s, there are some trade-offs. First, the J8004 is quite big, requiring a 16-by-7-inch space on the counter. It also isn’t great with softer, juicy fruits, which get gummy and block the juicer; you’ll need to alternate adding different types of produce when juicing with this machine to keep it running. And, as we mentioned earlier, its feed tube is an inch narrower than the Tribest’s, which makes a difference in how much prep work you need to do with vegetables. Because the J8004 is a budget machine, you’ll save about $150 up front, but you may lose some of those savings in juice left behind in the pulp you toss when juicing things like kale. Compared with the rest of the competition, however, we still think the J8004 extracts more juice from produce.
This is also a relatively powerful machine that doesn't require you to make a ton of cuts to your produce. We dropped two halves of a red delicious apple down the chute, and the machine easily juiced it. When it came time for us to test the hard produce, we were able to drop full beets into the tube and they juiced with little to no pressing needed on the food pusher. Some of the juicers sprayed juice, froth or pulp out their backside, getting the counter and walls dirty. This juicer had no difficulty maintaining the waste and was easy to clean.

When deciding which type of juicer is for you, the first thing you’ll need to think about is what kinds of juice you’d like to make most often. Look for a juicer with high yields for the produce you’ll be juicing. Masticating juicers work best for leafy greens, producing high amounts of dry pulp which mean less waste and cost in the long term. If you’ll only be juicing fruits and hard vegetables, a high-quality, less expensive centrifugal juicer may be your best bet.


"This is an easy to use, easy to clean citrus juicer that I wish I had bought 25 years ago! It is versatile (will juice small fruit like limes or large fruit such as Meyer lemons and even relatively small grapefruit. There is an adjustment allowing a little or a large amount of pulp to go through with the juice. It is well made and requires only a small space for storage. I will be buying oranges by the bag to have fresh juice. Probably my favorite small appliance."
If you're serious about juicing, it's best to get a juicer that fits nicely on your kitchen counter so you can leave it out rather than having to haul it out of a cupboard. That means paying close attention to the dimensions and even the length of the electrical cord. You don't want to buy a juicer that looks great in your kitchen but doesn't have a cord that reaches the outlet.
Juicers are expensive machines that take up a lot of space on a counter, but they’re a great investment for juice enthusiasts. With a juicer, you can offset the cost of boutique juice by making it at home—if you drink green juice five times a week, the savings can add up to hundreds of dollars over the course of a year. Because vegetables are pricey in the quantities needed for juicing, an efficient extractor will make more juice for your money. If the yield on your current juicer isn’t very high, or you have a model geared more toward soft fruit rather than tough greens, we recommend upgrading.
When it comes to features, the Omega J8006 Masticating Juicer is in a different league — starting with the way it actually produces juice. According to the manufacturer, rapidly spinning blades damage valuable oxidants and enzymes. The powerful, slow-speed auger in the Omega prevents this. It also delivers considerably more force, so fruit and vegetables are squeezed once as they enter the machine, and then the pulp is squeezed a second time – which maximizes goodness and minimizes waste.
Make sure your juicer suits your lifestyle in terms of how quickly, and how loudly they work. Masticating juicers are much quieter than centrifugal juicers so household members remain undisturbed while you get your juice on. If you need to make your juice fresh and fast in the morning, speed may be a concern. Masticating juicers are slower while some centrifugal juicers can juice an apple in just 30 seconds. Juicer models with multiple speeds are helpful because they extract the most juice out of your produce. Slow speeds are great for juicing soft fruits, like grapes and strawberries, while high speeds are better for firmer items like apples and carrots.
Finding the time and energy to shop and juice isn't always easy. With the HealthSmart® Juice Extractor, kick-starting and maintaining a healthy lifestyle couldn’t be simpler. Just one 6 to 10-oz. serving (175-300 ml) of juice fulfills the recommended daily value of Vitamin A and D, calcium, potassium, protein – plus fiber. All without the need for extra sugar, preservatives or additives.

Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
×