When it comes to super convenient press juicer, you’re looking for something that is easy to use, juices fast, and can be tucked away without any effort. Most importantly, it needs to be an easy to clean juicer, so you can juice in a hurry. These are all features that you’ll find in this juicer, and maybe that’s why its been consistently rated as one of the top rated press juicers in 2013 and 2014
If a significant portion of your calories are going to come from juice each day, mix up your produce. Go with veggie-heavy juices, using just a bit of fruit for sweetness. Alternate types of produce, and try something entirely new periodically. Farmers markets and ethnic grocery stores are great spots to find fruits and vegetables you’ve never tasted before.
An efficient design allows the Slowstar to crank out a high volume of juice within a small footprint of 6½ by 8 inches. The feed-tube opening is a relatively wide 2½ by 1½ inches—wider than the 1½-inch chute on the Omega J8004—which helps reduce the amount of vegetable prep you’ll have to do beforehand. The solid waste collects cleanly in a waste container that’s included. The Slowstar has a reverse button in the back in case you need to dislodge stuck vegetable matter, but I never needed to use it.

It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.

The commercial-grade Omega J8004 juicer does best with hard fruits and vegetables, and was more efficient than popular (and still great) juicers like the Breville Juice Fountain Plus we tested. It’s great for people on a budget with limited counter space. And with a 15-year warranty, the machine is built to last. In our tests, the J8004 extracted a fair amount of both green juice and carrot-apple juice, falling in the middle of the pack for both tests.
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.
The best juicers extract as much liquid as possible from fruits and vegetables, leaving behind very little pulp. Machines that leave large amounts of very moist pulp just aren’t doing their job. The same is true for froth. Every juicer makes some froth, but you don't want inches of bubbles – you want a machine that gives you the most juice for your money.
If you want to get into juicing, a great juicer can make a huge difference. Not only does a good juicer help you get the nutrients your body needs, but it also extracts them so quickly and easily without the mess. There are a ton of different juicers to choose from, and some are better than others. There are a number of factors to take into consideration when deciding which juicer to buy:
It’s never been easier to juice at home with the die-cast and stainless steel Cuisinart® Juice Extractor. The 3" feed tube easily handles your favorite whole fruits and vegetables and the adjustable flow spout eliminates drips and spills for clean countertops. The 5-speed control dial is easy to operate, letting you juice the softest berries, leafiest kale, or crunchiest apple into the 1-liter pitcher. The unique filter basket reduces foam, and the unit is so quiet, you won’t wake the family while you’re making fresh, nutritious juice for breakfast! 
We used three recipes to test how well each juicer handled hard produce (apples, carrots, etc.), soft produce (salad greens, fresh herbs, etc.) and almonds. In our test kitchen, we measured the results precisely, noted the amount of juice and pulp that emerged, and scored each juicer on performance. We also measured the noise in decibels, monitored spills or splatters, timed assembly and cleanup efforts, and noted such specifications as juicer dimensions and electrical cord length.
We got more juice out of the Kuvings Centrifugal Juicer NJ-9500UB than any other machine we tested. All that remained was a small amount of pulp that felt relatively dry to the touch. The Kuvings did an excellent job extracting juice from hard and soft produce in virtually all our tests. Since getting juice is the whole point of a juicer, the Kuvings got top marks.
For its smart design and features, as well as the brand moniker, the Breville 800CPXL is no doubt a desirable item to have on the countertop in an orange juice loving family’s kitchen, or in a small juice bar. It actually makes sense to have one along with a centrifuge or masticator, because when you only need citrus juice, cleanup is so much easier on the 800CPXL.
The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.
Juicing diets, juicing fasts, and juicing cleanses are all popular terms that get tossed around with the subject of juicing. This leaves a lot of people with the impression that juicing has to be a giant change you make in your life. The truth is, nearly everyone can benefit from juicing, even if it’s only a serving or two in the morning! By Grinding up your fruits and vegetables into a finely-filtered juice, you are removing a lot of the calories found in your foods—but keeping all the nutrients. Juicing is kind of like pre-digesting your foods, and has shown hints of helping to ensure proper overall digestive health [3].
We like this juicer a lot. It has a HUGE container to catch the pulp, so you can make lots of juices at once and bottle them. Also, the chute is really wide - we throw whole (smallish) apples, oranges and pears in it so we don't have to mess with slicing everything up. It pulverizes everything with no problem. The spout releasing the juice is a little wonky; we had a hard time figuring out what was actually fully open vs. fully closed (we are smart people with college degrees, I swear...it is honestly just a little unclear when you are twisting it). The pitcher catching the juice is great; it has a nice spout for us to easily pour it directly into bottles. The main downside is that it is a pain in the butt to clean, but that is every single juicer on the market, not just this one, so you can't hold that against it. Overall, we would definitely recommend this one!
The width of the chute will determine how much prep time you’ll need. A wide feed chute means less chopping time which means less total time spent juicing. Some of our top picks have at least a 3-inch wide feed chute such as the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor, Breville 800JEXL Juice Fountain Elite 1000-Watt Juice Extractor, and Cuisinart CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor.
How much are you really willing to spend? If you’re just planning on trying this healthy habit out first, then we recommend that you pick the most affordable ones on our list such as Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor, Juiceman JM400 Classic 2 Speed Juicer, and Hamilton Beach 67650A Big Mouth Pro Juice Extractor. If you’re a serious juicer with serious money to spend, we recommend you go with the Omega J8006 Nutrition Center masticating Dual-stage Juicer Juice Extractor.
Masticating juice extractors are also known as slow juicers because of their working mechanism that uses a slow rotating auger to crush the fruits against a stainless steel mesh at only 80-100 RPM. They do not shred or cut the fruits with blades like a centrifugal juicer, which makes them excellent for leafy greens as they get the best nutrients out of them at an extremely slow speed.

The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 is one of the best juicers in our review. It is a powerful machine that produces a lot of juice with very little froth output. It is quieter than most other juicers, comes with a 1000 mL pitcher and includes a long three-year warranty. If your counter space is limited, this might not be the right fit for you, but the Cuisinart Juice Extractor makes delicious and nutritious pulp-free juice with very little produce preparation needed.


There are other features which give you convenience. A juicer that has a large feeding tube, for instance, means you can put in large chunks, enabling you to skip the tedious chore of chopping your produce into small pieces. A large disposal spout is also a good feature as large spouts do not easily get clogged up and have the added advantage of producing a higher volume of juice.
While its blade chamber is super effective for firm fruits and veggies like carrots or apples, it doesn’t work that well on separated thin leaves. It spins and sends most of the leaves into the pulp collector before even shredding them. You can create some juice by packing the leaves together, but it still wastes too much of the veggies to consider it worth the effort.
If you're looking to get into the home-juicing game — good for you! You're doing something great for your health and will also probably save a ton of money on store-bought juices that can cost up to $12 per 12 oz. bottle. However, when it comes to making your own juices, the kind of juicer you use can really make or break your experience. Don't worry, we're here to help. To start, we compiled a list of the top-rated juicers according to Amazon reviews. 

We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.


Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
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Masticating juicers rely on direct mechanical force to chop and squeeze juice from fruits and vegetables. This method typically involves less power and lower temperatures and is regarded as the best juicing method by many. Masticating juicers are able to use less-powerful motors than other types of juicers because of the way they are designed. Less powerful motors mean less heat being put off. Many people believe that this reduction in heat helps to preserve the natural enzymes found in juice.
Be prepared to clean your juicer after every use. Bacteria love to feast on unpasteurized juices, so it’s important to clean your juicer every time you use it. And the sooner the better — the drier it gets, the harder pulp is to remove. During testing, we found that the strainer baskets and pulp spouts tended to need the most attention. So think about how often you’ll use your machine, what kind of fruits and vegetables you’ll be juicing (some leave more behind in your juicer than others), and how much time you’ll have to clean your machine.

We invested 96 hours in testing and evaluating juicers, measuring the amount of juice versus pulp each produced, the amount of froth created, and how much prep work was needed to get fruits and vegetables to fit through the food chute. In some cases, we had to spend quite a bit of time chopping hard produce into small- or medium-sized pieces, while other juicers had chutes so big we could simply cut an average apple, orange or beet into quarters. We also evaluated how much pressure we needed to exert to push fruits and vegetables through the juicer.
During juicing and cleanup, we also took note of how easy the machines were to use and clean. To see how efficient each model was at extraction, we measured juice yields by weight. In addition, we checked how much pulp was left over, looked for foam (which can be a sign of oxidation), and took note of if juicers backed up or jammed during juicing. We also measured the temperature of the juice, and compared it with the temperature of the produce we started out with. Finally, we tasted each juice for freshness and pulp, docking points from machines that yielded juice with unpleasant levels of fiber. Flavor is also an indicator of how much of the greens actually made it into the glass—sweeter juices had more grape and didn’t do as good of a job juicing greens.

"ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!!!!!!! I have had A LOT of juicers over the years and this one blows them all away! it is super fast and pulp is super dry. you get way more than twice the juice! I juiced a lot of veg, 2 pitchers (that it comes with about 4 cups each) and the pulp container was not even half full, yet there was no pulp in the juice! I've even had the slow masticating juicers, this is better. easy to put together, take apart and clean!!!!! i love it in every way. and before you believe that juice from slow juicers is better for you, look it up, thats what i did, and its not as long as its done fast with a good juicer! I truly love this juicer in every way! I will never go back to the lower end ones (that cost about the same anyway, oh brother!) or the expensive slow hard to use and clean ones! Wish i had this in the beginning of my juicing ventures 20 years ago!!!!!!!!!!!"


Juicing isn’t a trend that will go away anytime soon. While some of what is being said online about the benefits of juicing is purely pulp fiction, there are still some benefits to this healthy habit. Namely, enabling certain individuals to add vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients to their diet. These particular individuals are those who seem to have difficulty incorporating fruits and vegetables into their daily meals. In any case, if you want to try juicing or would like to replace an out-of-date juicer in your kitchen, we’ve got just the guide to help you find the best match.

The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
The vertical masticating Omega VRT400HDS was disappointing. The first trial of the green juice was a failure; the auger couldn’t pull anything through. I disassembled it, cleaned it, and put it back together and finally got it to work. Its yields were low compared with that of other juicers and the machine felt really flimsy, almost buckling as I pushed leaves of kale and apple wedges through the feed tube. It produced the most foam of all the juicers in the testing group, even more than the centrifugal juicers. It does, however, come with a 15-year warranty.

The Omega VSJ843 features a dual-edged auger that looks almost identical to the auger on the Tribest Slowstar. The space on the underside of the auger is roomy, so wiping out packed solid vegetable matter with your finger is easy. In his video review of the Omega VSJ843, Kohler mentions that the Omega had a few stoppages as he juiced two pounds of carrots, but we didn’t experience that during our tests.


We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.
Features: Overwhelmed by all the juice options available today? Looking for the ideal juice drink that's fresh, free of preservatives and tastes 10 times better than store-bought juices? Take the plunge and go with Hamilton Beach's Big Mouth® Pro Juice Extractor. Rated “Most Efficient” in a recent issue of Food & Wine magazine, the Big Mouth® Pro Juice Extractor packs all the same punch that you would expect from a Hamilton Beach juice extractor, featuring reliable efficiency, high speed and no-fuss cleanup. With a powerful 1.1 horsepower (Hp) motor and extra-wide feed chute that fits almost anything you put in, it flawlessly performs the task of extracting the juice from a whole apple in 3 seconds flat. What’s more, the designers of Hamilton Beach have minimized the fuss of cleanup, so you can thoroughly clean in no time flat and enjoy ...
"I wanted a reasonably priced juicer to make sure I actually LIKED juicing first. I decided to go with this one based off it's reviews, and I really don't plan on upgrading any time soon! This juicer does a great job and it's so easy to clean. I love that it comes with a brush to get the pulp out of the mesh part too. For anyone who wants to start juicing without breaking the bank, definitely try this one out."
Celery will juice just fine, but for greens I use one of those slow juicers, the vertical version. The celery, raspberry, strawberry and things like kiwi come out better on slow juicers. It appears that “one size fits all” idea is only good for T-shirts, so considering one can get slow masticating juicers for much less then they used to cost there is no reason not to have one as well, so you can make nectar out of spinach and celery – it does taste weird but it is quite nutrition.
"... I have been juicing just about every morning for the past 3.5 weeks, and I have noticed a difference when using this juicer. While this juicer takes longer than the centrifugal force competitor, the pulp comes out very, very dry, and there are no chunks left un-juiced! It is also very easy to install, put together, and clean, takes less than a few minutes. I really like the suction cup feet on the bottom of this machine, it keeps it still while I am juicing, so I do not lose any juice. Also, I love the handle at the top of the machine, it is lightweight and easy to pick up and maneuver.
An efficient design allows the Slowstar to crank out a high volume of juice within a small footprint of 6½ by 8 inches. The feed-tube opening is a relatively wide 2½ by 1½ inches—wider than the 1½-inch chute on the Omega J8004—which helps reduce the amount of vegetable prep you’ll have to do beforehand. The solid waste collects cleanly in a waste container that’s included. The Slowstar has a reverse button in the back in case you need to dislodge stuck vegetable matter, but I never needed to use it.

The gist: To add another Breville model to the list, we've got the 800JEXL. Though it comes with a heftier price tag than the JE98XL, the 800JEXL is called "elite" for a reason. Breville endearingly refers to this model as the "Rolls Royce" of juicers, with its powerful 1000-watt motor and heavy grade die-cast metal body.  Like the JE98XL, it has a dual high/low-speed switch so you can switch depending on if you're juicing hard or soft produce. This model's "fast" speed setting beats the JE98XL at 13,000rpm, so the process is a bit quicker. In terms of overall quality, the 800JEXL is definitely top notch and great for any serious juicer looking to make a worthy investment.
No matter what type of juicer you purchase, you’ll end up facing the issue of dealing with the fibrous pulp that is left over. There are many juicers that are marketed specifically as containing ‘pulp-ejection systems’. While this is by no means a lie, it is a bit of an exaggeration of the truth. It would be like a car salesman advertising a car by saying it had an engine exhaust system. Sure, it does, in fact, have such a system—but so does every other car. In reality, every juicer has some sort of ‘pulp ejection’ system. The same can be said for nearly every product for sale to consumers, and marketers will often cling to anything before they fail to mention something that makes their product unique. You shouldn’t avoid juicers marketed as having ‘pulp ejection systems’, but it’s also not advisable to buy based on that label.
The commercial-grade Omega J8004 juicer does best with hard fruits and vegetables, and was more efficient than popular (and still great) juicers like the Breville Juice Fountain Plus we tested. It’s great for people on a budget with limited counter space. And with a 15-year warranty, the machine is built to last. In our tests, the J8004 extracted a fair amount of both green juice and carrot-apple juice, falling in the middle of the pack for both tests.
Masticating juicers use an Auger, which is very similar in appearance to a drill-bit. Mos feature some sort of cork-screw type design that chops up food while pressing it forward at the same time. This is a very efficient means of applying force and therefore requires the less powerful motor. Typically, a masticating juicer’s auger is made of a high-density plastic like the GE Ultem found on the Breville 800JEXL. the use of these durable materials is favorable, considering the auger is the part doing all the work.
Make sure your juicer suits your lifestyle in terms of how quickly, and how loudly they work. Masticating juicers are much quieter than centrifugal juicers so household members remain undisturbed while you get your juice on. If you need to make your juice fresh and fast in the morning, speed may be a concern. Masticating juicers are slower while some centrifugal juicers can juice an apple in just 30 seconds. Juicer models with multiple speeds are helpful because they extract the most juice out of your produce. Slow speeds are great for juicing soft fruits, like grapes and strawberries, while high speeds are better for firmer items like apples and carrots.
These are also called centrifugal juicers, have a spinning mesh basket with a grated bottom. Produce is whirled against the grate, shredding it and releasing the juice. Pulp spins into a separate basket, while the juice runs out the device’s spout. Centrifugal juicers work much faster than masticating juicers, but are also quite a bit louder and yield less juice. They work very well on the fruits and veggies most likely to be juiced, such as apples, oranges, and carrots, but tend to struggle with leafy greens like kale. These juicers are the less expensive choice.
To get that tasty juice out of your favorite fruits and veggies you might need an appliance that can make your work easy. That appliance can either be a citrus juicer or a juice extractor. They both will get you juice but differ in terms of mechanism. A juice extractor first cuts the fruits or vegetables and rotates/spins them at a very high speed that separates seeds, skin, and pulp from the juice. A simple citrus juicer doesn’t provide many features like a juice extractor and is much cheaper than the extractor.

In our tests, this juicer created the least amount of froth of any machine we tested, which means you get fewer bubbles and waste and more juice. Our food-prep time was minimal. This juicer has a 3-inch-wide food chute, so you don't have to spend a lot of time chopping fruits or veggies to fit. However, you need to spend some time cleaning this juicer, since it comes with nine separate parts. Still, this process is made somewhat easier by the included cleaning brush. Plus, some parts are dishwasher-safe. This is a big machine, so you probably want to find a spot on a kitchen counter to store it for daily use. It comes with a tall pitcher, a froth separator and a nonslip base so it stays in place during operation. This is a noisy juicer but no more so than any other – they're all fairly loud.
Are you looking for a quick daily juice to take on your commute or something packed with all kinds of unusual ingredients to enjoy on a luxurious weekend morning? To make the most out of your juicer, get a head start by researching recipes involving your favorite ingredients. There are lots of online guides for beginners. The last thing you want to do is purchase a juicer and have it gather dust because you got sick of straight carrot juice.
The Omega VSJ843 features a dual-edged auger that looks almost identical to the auger on the Tribest Slowstar. The space on the underside of the auger is roomy, so wiping out packed solid vegetable matter with your finger is easy. In his video review of the Omega VSJ843, Kohler mentions that the Omega had a few stoppages as he juiced two pounds of carrots, but we didn’t experience that during our tests.
Feeder tubes are the parts of juicers where the food is inserted. The larger your feeder tube, the more fruits, and vegetables you’ll be able to cram in at once. Some less-expensive juicers have tops that come off completely, similar to blenders. Juicers with feeder tubes also offer the advantage of being able to press the fruits and veggies into the juicer, helping to chop and grind them up.
Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.
The Hurom’s feed chute is made of opaque plastic, meaning you can’t see what’s happening as you feed produce into the juicer — is it making weird noises because it’s about to jam, or is it powering through a particularly stringy piece of celery? The chute also had a narrower mouth than most of our finalists, requiring us to quarter our apples and lemons before adding them. Not a dealbreaker, but we preferred larger, more transparent chutes as they require a little less prep work and you can see what’s going on.
During juicing and cleanup, we also took note of how easy the machines were to use and clean. To see how efficient each model was at extraction, we measured juice yields by weight. In addition, we checked how much pulp was left over, looked for foam (which can be a sign of oxidation), and took note of if juicers backed up or jammed during juicing. We also measured the temperature of the juice, and compared it with the temperature of the produce we started out with. Finally, we tasted each juice for freshness and pulp, docking points from machines that yielded juice with unpleasant levels of fiber. Flavor is also an indicator of how much of the greens actually made it into the glass—sweeter juices had more grape and didn’t do as good of a job juicing greens.
Centrifugal: This is the most common type of juicer sold at kitchen stores and big box retailers. It’s the most affordable. Once you feed in the vegetables or fruit, it shreds and spins very fast so that the pulp and bits of fruit and vegetables are caught by a strainer or filter and the juice spins out. Centrifugal juicers can be loud. And, because they are fast, they heat up, which can affect the nutritional value of the juice.
Juicers vary wildly in price starting as low as $50 to high end models for $1000, but generally, the more you pay, the higher the juice yield and the lower the pulp. How much you’re willing to invest will depend on how often you plan to juice and what type of produce you want to juice. However, it’s important to consider the price of juicing over time on top of the cost of the juicer itself. Juicers that produce lower yields mean you'll be spending a lot more on fruits and veggies over time. Expensive juicers also often come with a lengthy warranty to ensure years of quality juicing.
The Hurom comes with a lidded pitcher for collecting juice, but its slow-turning auger produced so little splatter that we also had no problem putting our own glass directly under the juice spout. Clean juicing makes for means you’re not beholden to the Hurom’s pitcher, making it easier to juice straight into your to-go cup and reducing counter clean-up. (When we tried this with the Juiceman, we ended up with a foot-wide splatter radius.)
If the Breville juice fountain elite is a little too high end for you, but you still want a quality juicer, the Breville juice fountain plus is a great option. This juicer has a great balance of all features- speed, efficiency, simplicity, durability and price, meaning its a great all round centrifugal juicer. Read our review here, and see if you agree with us- its extremely easy to use (and to clean!) while still providing beautiful quality juice at record time. A strong contender…

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KitchenAid makes a juicing attachment for the Artisan stand mixer, the Masticating Juicer Attachment, as well as the standalone Maximum Extraction Juicer. In our research, we found that the Maximum Extraction Juicer didn’t compare to our picks in yields, extraction, build quality, or warranty (one-year limited). We don’t think it’s worth testing because it has too many shortcomings for its high price. The juicing attachment for the Artisan mixer is cheaper than a full juicer, but it gets poor reviews on Amazon for being hard to use and clean, and it seems to have difficulty with hard roots and vegetables.

It’s never been easier to juice at home with the die-cast and stainless steel Cuisinart® Juice Extractor. The 3" feed tube easily handles your favorite whole fruits and vegetables and the adjustable flow spout eliminates drips and spills for clean countertops. The 5-speed control dial is easy to operate, letting you juice the softest berries, leafiest kale, or crunchiest apple into the 1-liter pitcher. The unique filter basket reduces foam, and the unit is so quiet, you won’t wake the family while you’re making fresh, nutritious juice for breakfast! 
A twin-gear juicer such as one of those in the Tribest Greenstar series can extract the most juice from greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, but isn’t good at juicing fruit. The juicers in this series are specialty machines usually used in professional juice bars; they’re also quite expensive. We did not test any twin-gear juicers for this review.
With all of the above info in mind, you’ll be able to consider juicers, their features, and any specialized purpose they may offer with a fresh new perspective. Taking into account what features you feel will best serve your needs, you’ll be able to sift through the marketing jargon and really compare function. Many people new to juicing are often taken back by the prices of most of the juicers with good reviews. A typical juicer can vary tremendously depending on the quality of parts, the type of functionality, and any specialized features. High-RPM motors found in centrifugal juicers tend to raise cost more than the motors found in slow juicers such as masticating juicers. However, the Auger of masticating juicers often costs more than the filter and teeth used to grind up produce in the centrifugal models.

Not only thick and firm produce like apples or carrots, or more fibrous leaves like kale, cabbage, or celery, the NC900HDC would take even the thinnest of leaves like spinach or dandelion. Its strong squeeze takes every single drop of nutritious liquid out of your veggies, leaving only fiber to the pulp. This is the reason why it also takes the first position in our list of the best juicers for leafy veggies.

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