Kuvings released the C7000 in 2017. Kohler said this model has improved features compared with the Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer (B6000), which didn’t impress us in testing. From watching a comparison review of the C7000 and the Whole Slow Juicer, we see that the C7000 has a new funnel for easily feeding produce, doesn’t produce as much pulp, and has a more recessed auger for easier cleaning compared with its predecessor. But the C7000 still spins faster than our pick at 60 rpm, and is more expensive at the time of writing. And although Kuvings juicers boast a 3-inch feed tube that, in theory, can accept whole fruit, most apples in the store are much bigger than three inches in diameter, so that’s a wash. When we tested the Whole Slow Juicer, it didn’t hold a candle to the juice quality from Tribest or Omega machines. The Kuvings Silent Juicer was also an underperformer, giving us over an ounce less of green juice than the Slowstar. The resulting juice was also unpleasantly pulpy.
We spent 96 hours juicing fruits and vegetables, both hard and soft, and attempted to make nut milks. In the end, our favorite juicer was the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, a powerful machine that produces excellent juice and nut milk. It leaves behind only a little pulp and less froth than any of the other juicers we tested. In addition, it has a big food chute.
Twin-gear juicers: For greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, a twin-gear juicer extracts the most juice. Twin-gear juicers are also the most expensive models, often costing over $500. As the name suggests, two gears work together to crush the cell walls of the vegetable and extract the juice. They’re best for greens and other tough fibrous vegetables and not great for fruit.
We spent 96 hours juicing fruits and vegetables, both hard and soft, and attempted to make nut milks. In the end, our favorite juicer was the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, a powerful machine that produces excellent juice and nut milk. It leaves behind only a little pulp and less froth than any of the other juicers we tested. In addition, it has a big food chute.
Great machine! This is our first juicer so we really didn’t know what we were getting into but I’m very pleased with this machine. It’s fast not too loud easy to Clean especially if you have the cleaning brushes which I think is a must have! Just one tip don’t over do it, it needs to rest intermittently and if it sounds like it’s slowing down do a mid juice cleaning so that the pulp doesn’t overflow.
Whereas the Omega J8004 is a commercial-quality machine, the Omega NC800 is designed for household use. When it came to green juice, the output was almost identical. The carrot juice was a different story, though. The NC800 yielded only 12.3 ounces. John Kohler at DiscountJuicers.com said that this machine put out 15 percent more juice than its predecessor, but we found that it actually put out 25 percent less carrot juice than the J8004. The nice feature of this juicer is that it boasts a larger feed tube than its predecessor, which makes prep a little easier.

Of course, it's important to note that this is an entry-level model, so it is lacking in some features. For example, it only has two settings - "on" and "off " — so it'll either juice what you put in there, or it won't. It's also a little loud, and according to some reviews, can get messy. In general, this is best for those just getting into juicing and who don't necessarily know if it'll be a long-term investment for them.
"I kept putting this item in my cart deciding between this one and the next higher version. My friend had the next size but she also has a very large kitchen and plenty of counter space, while me I have 1/4 of the counter space. After about a month in my basket I decided to give it a try. I'm glad I did buy this compact version, it's perfect for me. I make one container full and clean out the where the pulp is stored. It also stores nicely under my cabinet, which the other version would not. Since this is my first juicer, I'm not sure how 'dry' the pulp should be but to me it's pretty dry. Not something that is bone dry but enough that I can probably make a small ball out of the pulp...mind you I haven't tried it but may. I also juiced Kale and Swiss Chard I saw quite a bit of juice coming out. I did with the recommendation of rolling it up in a small tight ball and it worked. Not sure if it was because the kale and Swiss chard were straight from the garden to the juicer but I definitely did see juice coming out."
If you're serious about juicing, it's best to get a juicer that fits nicely on your kitchen counter so you can leave it out rather than having to haul it out of a cupboard. That means paying close attention to the dimensions and even the length of the electrical cord. You don't want to buy a juicer that looks great in your kitchen but doesn't have a cord that reaches the outlet.
The Breville’s pulverizing power made short order of whole beets and carrots, and we cut apples in half to prep them ready for juicing. Other machines require much more prep time, as they can only manage hard produce in small pieces. We found the Breville can juice anything if it fits down the chute, and it does so very efficiently. It creates very little pulp and froth, so you know you’re getting the most out of your fruits and veggies. The included pitcher is tall, and its special juicer nozzle opening prevents juice dripping on your countertops. It also has an attached froth separator, which strains your juice for you. Its seven parts are easy to assemble, but only five are dishwasher safe.
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.

Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.


Easy to clean: We’ve found that all juicers have one thing in common—they’re a bit of a pain to clean. The parts aren’t dishwasher safe, so you have to clean the components by hand. And they have a lot of small nooks and crannies that can trap gunk. We looked for vertical juicers that come with specialized brushes to make cleaning easier, and considered horizontal models, like those from Omega, that are a little simpler to clean because the juicing screens aren’t as big.
In our tests, the Hamilton Beach juicer produced lots of juice for each of our three test recipes. It handled hard and soft produce well, though it could have processed the leafy greens slightly better. Even so, it produced a high juice yield compared to other products after straining away the froth. This juicer does leave a lot of pulp in your juice, which is great if you’re looking to up your fiber intake. Unlike some others, the Hamilton Beach doesn’t come with a pitcher to collect your juice. Its nozzle also points directly down, so find the right container to catch your juice and prevent spills.
Are you looking for a quick daily juice to take on your commute or something packed with all kinds of unusual ingredients to enjoy on a luxurious weekend morning? To make the most out of your juicer, get a head start by researching recipes involving your favorite ingredients. There are lots of online guides for beginners. The last thing you want to do is purchase a juicer and have it gather dust because you got sick of straight carrot juice.
If a significant portion of your calories are going to come from juice each day, mix up your produce. Go with veggie-heavy juices, using just a bit of fruit for sweetness. Alternate types of produce, and try something entirely new periodically. Farmers markets and ethnic grocery stores are great spots to find fruits and vegetables you’ve never tasted before.
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