In researching this guide, we spoke to John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com and Matt Shook of JuiceLand in Austin, Texas, to find out about leading juicers and to compare similar models. Though we don’t normally seek out retailers as experts to interview for our guides, John Kohler is different—we think he’s the most knowledgeable juicer on the Internet. He’s been juicing for 25 years, and his YouTube videos comparing and talking about juicers and juicing have over 27 million views. Wirecutter founder Brian Lam wrote the original juicer review for Wirecutter, using John’s knowledge as a guide. Because Kohler stocks all brands of juicers and his reviews are objective, we don’t think he’s biased toward any particular models.
If juicing leafy greens is an emphasis for you or you want a machine that handles other kitchen prep the Omega J8006 is your best choice. This classic cold press masticating juicer has been a best seller for years and produced the highest volume of kale juice of all the juicers we tested. It works quietly at slow speeds (only 80 RPM) to extract juice from all kinds of produce. Its dual-stage juicing system mimics how humans chew–the crush and press process produces drier pulp and high juice yield. We did have to spend more time cutting fruits and vegetables up to fit them into the small feed tube and occasionally had to stop juicing and use the “reverse” feature to handle clogs. It also produced slightly less juice from hard fruits and vegetables and as a horizontal model has a bigger countertop footprint. However, it offers additional functions such as pureeing nuts into nut butters, grinding spices and coffee, making pasta, and baby food with an extremely generous 15 year warranty.
We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.

If you are a newbie at juicing, you may be hesitant to spend on the pricier model. However, it’s not only the price of the juicer that you should consider but the cost of the whole juicing process over time. To illustrate, the cheaper centrifugal juicers are not as efficient as the masticating or triturating ones such that there are lower juice yield and much wastage of produce.


When your fruits or vegetables are put into a centrifugal juicer, they are grated into smaller slices and pieces through sharp teeth-like blades. These blades are usually found on the bottom of a basket-like part, such as the Nutridisk of the Breville 800JEXL, and less efficient than the augers found on masticating juicers. Juice is extracted during this process by through the pressure of centrifugal force as the ground-up parts of the fruits and vegetables are pressed against walls of a filter. The faster these juicers spin, the greater the amount of force applied during this process, and the great the amount of juice that is extracted. A typical Centrifugal juicer will have a motor with 800 watts of power or more spin at nearly 15,000 RPM and are regarded as being very noisy. The juices produced by these juicers have shorter shelf lives due to increased aeration associated with centrifugal separation processes.

The US Department of Agriculture warns against relying on juice as your sole source of nutrition. This kind of diet won’t give you enough protein or fiber to maintain muscle mass and keep you feeling full. When we spoke with nutritionist Shereen Lehman, she reiterated this point. “Juicing alone won’t fix an unhealthy diet,” she told us. “It’s also important to cut out the junk foods and eat more lean protein sources, dairy or calcium sources, whole grains, and more fruits and veggies.”

I researched and compared several mid priced juicers to the most expensive I could find. $150 was the most I wanted to spend because I recently bought a Vita-Mix blender ($500+). I finally decided on the Breville Juice Fountain Plus JE 95XL (850 watts). But Bed, Bath and Beyond, failed to have it it stock. I made it out there without calling to see if they had it in stock and again, they did not. Not wanting to leave empty handed, I started looking at some of the other juicers they had. That's when I came across the Cuisinart CJE-1000.

The Hurom comes with a lidded pitcher for collecting juice, but its slow-turning auger produced so little splatter that we also had no problem putting our own glass directly under the juice spout. Clean juicing makes for means you’re not beholden to the Hurom’s pitcher, making it easier to juice straight into your to-go cup and reducing counter clean-up. (When we tried this with the Juiceman, we ended up with a foot-wide splatter radius.)


Great machine! This is our first juicer so we really didn’t know what we were getting into but I’m very pleased with this machine. It’s fast not too loud easy to Clean especially if you have the cleaning brushes which I think is a must have! Just one tip don’t over do it, it needs to rest intermittently and if it sounds like it’s slowing down do a mid juice cleaning so that the pulp doesn’t overflow.
We tested the same three recipes in each juicer to see how well each machine performed with various types of fruits and vegetables: soft produce, leafy greens and hard foods. The Cuisinart Juice Extractor yielded a high percentage of juice for each recipe. What's more, most of the juice extracted had little to no froth, so it was easier to drink straight from the machine. Most juicers struggle when it comes to juicing leafy greens and nuts, but this machine handled both relatively well. Most of the other machines were unable to effectively process almonds, but this juicer was able to create a decent amount of almond milk, with the almonds finely shredded and collected in the pulp container.

To look for the best juicers to test, we read editorial reviews of juicers from Good Housekeeping, Real Simple, and Top Ten Reviews, and watched video reviews and comparisons of new models. We also looked at the offerings from the four main juicer companies at the forefront of juicing technology: Tribest, Kuvings, Omega, and Hurom. John Kohler said that these companies innovate and improve upon their technology, and the cheaper versions are often Chinese knockoffs. Watching hours of side-by-side comparison videos and reviews also helped narrow what to include from each brand.

Noise level: The machinery inside of a juicer can be a little noisy at times, and that's problematic if you're planning on juicing early in the morning before work. You wouldn't, after all, want to wake up the rest of the family while juicing. In general, high-speed juicers with a centrifugal design are the noisiest, while masticating juicers are quieter.
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
There are several other juicers in the market that warrant a look at. Unfortunately, we didn’t have time to review them. You might want to check them out: Super Angel Pro Stainless Steel Juicer, Tribest Greenstar Elite GSE-5050 Jumbo Twin Gear Cold Press Juice Extractor, Green Power KPE1304 Twin Gear Juicer, VonShef Professional Powerful Wide Mouth Whole Fruit Juicer Machine 700W, and BLACK+DECKER JE2200B Fruit & Vegetable Juicer.
Masticating juicers rely on direct mechanical force to chop and squeeze juice from fruits and vegetables. This method typically involves less power and lower temperatures and is regarded as the best juicing method by many. Masticating juicers are able to use less-powerful motors than other types of juicers because of the way they are designed. Less powerful motors mean less heat being put off. Many people believe that this reduction in heat helps to preserve the natural enzymes found in juice.
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Good Housekeeping says this juicer is "as good as it gets" without having to spend a fortune, though the Breville isn't as adept at juicing greens like kale. Juicer Fanatics says that it's a great juicer for newbies who don't want to spend $300 or more for a juicer. The Wirecutter agrees that the juicer is fast and does the job passably well — so long as there aren't greens involved — but warns that it's noisy and you could get better buy spending a bit more.

For those just trying out the juicing trend, on a budget, or who will only be juicing every now and then; the Hamilton Beach Big Mouth Pro is an incredible value. Retailing at only $50 it has features that rival much more expensive models. A 3” chute means much less time prepping fruits and vegetables for juicing–it even handled whole carrots and whole apples with no problem. Easy to assemble, clean, and use; this centrifugal model has a 1.1 horsepower motor (equivalent to about 820 watts). It’s small enough to fit under the counter but note that it’s largely made of plastic so it may not have the aesthetic you’re looking for. It comes with a small 20 oz pitcher but the height of the juice spout means it’s simple to use your own pitchers for larger batch juicing (and it has a large external pulp container too). This model did a fantastic job on all our tests and produced high quality, high volume juices–it even handled notoriously tricky to juice kale extremely well. We highly recommend this juicer as a starter model or for those who may not juice often but want the option to. It comes with a 3-year warranty and receives gret reviews online.
The size of these two containers will help determine how much juice you can make. Some juicers such as the Juiceman JM400 Classic 2 Speed Juicer have a juice pitcher that is less than 1 liter while the pulp container is less than 1.5 liters. Some juicers offer much larger containers such as the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor and Cuisinart CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor.
Although I don’t claim to be a healthy-living enthusiast, I do regularly enjoy grassy green juices and spicy beet turmeric shots myself. I’ve personally owned a few different juicers over the years—including long-term testing our picks for the past three years—and I also have a lot of experience working with the commercial Champion juicer in restaurant kitchens.

The Slowstar has a proprietary “Duoblade” auger, which has two cutting edges to chop and crush more with each rotation than single edges can. The motor uses a three-gear system that allows it to turn slowly but with plenty of torque; in our testing, we found that this translates to low-temperature juice with maximum yields from even low-moisture greens like kale.

This machine does come with a 1000 mL pitcher, which means it could hold roughly three 12-ounce sodas. Fresh juice does not keep for long, so you typically wouldn’t make lots of it in advance; however, if you are making juice for your family or for the next day or two, it is nice not to have to stop and empty the pulp. You can get through a lot of produce before you need to pause.


Not sure what to do with the leftover pulp? The leftover pulp is mostly fiber and cellulose, which like the juice, contains necessary vital nutrients for the daily diet. Any leftover pulp can be used in a variety of recipes, frothy drinks, casseroles or soups, as well as for garden composting. Thirsty for something other than juice? The HealthSmart® Juice Extractor can help children, teens and adults get their daily vitamin intake with the option of making soy, almond or rice milk. To start, soak one cup of soybeans, almonds or rice in four cups of water for 24 to 48 hours in the refrigerator, and then slowly pour one cup into the food chute. The liquid extracted from the soaked mixture is the "milk." For enhanced milk flavor, consider adding vanilla or honey.
The gist: This Hamilton Beach model is perfect for either those who are just getting into juicing or even seasoned juicers who simply don't want to break the bank by spending several hundred bucks on a juicer.  It cranks out 800 watts of power and has a 3-inch-wide chute that you can fit whole foods into (for example, a whole apple), so you can spend less time cutting and prepping. All of the juicer's removable parts are dishwasher safe, which makes clean-up super easy. Plus, it even comes with a handy cleaning brush.
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