Masticating juicers rely on direct mechanical force to chop and squeeze juice from fruits and vegetables. This method typically involves less power and lower temperatures and is regarded as the best juicing method by many. Masticating juicers are able to use less-powerful motors than other types of juicers because of the way they are designed. Less powerful motors mean less heat being put off. Many people believe that this reduction in heat helps to preserve the natural enzymes found in juice.
There are plenty of juicers available between $60 and $160. We tested ten products within this range and found more expensive juicers are not necessarily better. Perks like multiple speed settings, a long warranty and an included pitcher appeared at several different price points, as did the absence of accessories. We advise shopping the features instead of letting price alone guide you.
Traditionally, this is the most common type of juicer. These typically utilize a fast-spinning metal blade that spins against a mesh filter, separating juice from flesh via centrifugal force. The juice and pulp are then separated into different containers. The problem with centrifugal juicers is that the fast-spinning metal blade generates heat, which destroys some of the enzymes in the fruits and vegetables you're juicing. The heat also oxidizes those nutrients, rendering less nutritious juice than a cold-press juicer.

The Omega J8006 Nutrition Center Juicer is a masticating type of press juicer which works at slow speeds (only 80 RPM) to efficiently extract juice from all kinds of products without generating heat and foam. The juice yield is high, is of superior quality and boasts of a shelf life of up to 72 hours. This juicer works quietly and is backed up by a 15-year warranty for your peace of mind. What’s more, it performs multiple functions as a nut butter and pasta making machine. The price may be limiting but its efficiency lets you save on produce over time. If you’re after high-quality juice, we rate this as the best masticating juicer on the market.

In researching this guide, we spoke to John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com and Matt Shook of JuiceLand in Austin, Texas, to find out about leading juicers and to compare similar models. Though we don’t normally seek out retailers as experts to interview for our guides, John Kohler is different—we think he’s the most knowledgeable juicer on the Internet. He’s been juicing for 25 years, and his YouTube videos comparing and talking about juicers and juicing have over 27 million views. Wirecutter founder Brian Lam wrote the original juicer review for Wirecutter, using John’s knowledge as a guide. Because Kohler stocks all brands of juicers and his reviews are objective, we don’t think he’s biased toward any particular models.
Not sure what to do with the leftover pulp? The leftover pulp is mostly fiber and cellulose, which like the juice, contains necessary vital nutrients for the daily diet. Any leftover pulp can be used in a variety of recipes, frothy drinks, casseroles or soups, as well as for garden composting. Thirsty for something other than juice? The HealthSmart® Juice Extractor can help children, teens and adults get their daily vitamin intake with the option of making soy, almond or rice milk. To start, soak one cup of soybeans, almonds or rice in four cups of water for 24 to 48 hours in the refrigerator, and then slowly pour one cup into the food chute. The liquid extracted from the soaked mixture is the "milk." For enhanced milk flavor, consider adding vanilla or honey.

There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.
Although I don’t claim to be a healthy-living enthusiast, I do regularly enjoy grassy green juices and spicy beet turmeric shots myself. I’ve personally owned a few different juicers over the years—including long-term testing our picks for the past three years—and I also have a lot of experience working with the commercial Champion juicer in restaurant kitchens.
The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.

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The Slowstar has a proprietary “Duoblade” auger, which has two cutting edges to chop and crush more with each rotation than single edges can. The motor uses a three-gear system that allows it to turn slowly but with plenty of torque; in our testing, we found that this translates to low-temperature juice with maximum yields from even low-moisture greens like kale.
These are also called centrifugal juicers, have a spinning mesh basket with a grated bottom. Produce is whirled against the grate, shredding it and releasing the juice. Pulp spins into a separate basket, while the juice runs out the device’s spout. Centrifugal juicers work much faster than masticating juicers, but are also quite a bit louder and yield less juice. They work very well on the fruits and veggies most likely to be juiced, such as apples, oranges, and carrots, but tend to struggle with leafy greens like kale. These juicers are the less expensive choice.
If you're looking to get into the home-juicing game — good for you! You're doing something great for your health and will also probably save a ton of money on store-bought juices that can cost up to $12 per 12 oz. bottle. However, when it comes to making your own juices, the kind of juicer you use can really make or break your experience. Don't worry, we're here to help. To start, we compiled a list of the top-rated juicers according to Amazon reviews. 
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
When you feed the machine with fruits and veggies, it will first crush and slice them all up using its pocket recesses. Sinewy stuff like cabbage leaves or celery will be automatically cut short by the cutting teeth, a feature missing on many other juicers. This significantly reduces clogging and tangling (but if that ever happens, there’s a Reverse button to release the culprit).
The gist: To add another Breville model to the list, we've got the 800JEXL. Though it comes with a heftier price tag than the JE98XL, the 800JEXL is called "elite" for a reason. Breville endearingly refers to this model as the "Rolls Royce" of juicers, with its powerful 1000-watt motor and heavy grade die-cast metal body.  Like the JE98XL, it has a dual high/low-speed switch so you can switch depending on if you're juicing hard or soft produce. This model's "fast" speed setting beats the JE98XL at 13,000rpm, so the process is a bit quicker. In terms of overall quality, the 800JEXL is definitely top notch and great for any serious juicer looking to make a worthy investment.

Juicing isn’t for everyone. Registered dietitian Sylvia North warned us that “if you have a clinically diagnosed inflammatory bowel or kidney disease, some nutrients found in high concentrations in green juices may not be appropriate.” If you’re navigating any health challenges, it’s best to talk to your registered dietitian or doctor before you shop for a juicer.

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